Social media giant will search for other ways to monetize the #1 most downloaded app in the world 

Facebook, Inc. abandons its plan tp monetize WhatsApp, a messenger it bought in 2012 for $22 billion. Initially annual subscription to WhatsApp was $0.99, and the app also made money from download fees, but Facebook made it completely free, planning to monetize through selling ads, as The Wall Street Journal explains. 

As of the beginning of 2020, WhatsApp is used by 1.5 billion people globally, but has yet to bring profit to Facebook. 

In May 2019, Facebook officially introduced the prototypes for WhasApp ads in app’s Status feature. However, these plans are laid to rest for now, partly due to the actions of the previous management at WhatsApp. 

Its creators Jan Koum and Brian Acton were openly against ads in WhatsApp, and it seems to be one of the key factors in their decision to leave the company. 

Koum and Acton were the ones who changed WhatsApp’s terms of use to strictly forbid adding ads to it. The idea was to create potential PR problems for Facebook if it ever tries to introduce ads to WhatsApp without notifying the customers in no uncertain terms. 

According to WSJ, 98% of Facebook’s revenue in the third quarter came from ads, so it remains to be seen for how long will the social media giant tolerate unprofitable WhatsApp, and whether Facebook will be able to come up with more creative and user-friendly way to monetize it. [:ru]Social media giant will search for other ways to monetize the #1 most downloaded app in the world 

Facebook, Inc. abandons its plan tp monetize WhatsApp, a messenger it bought in 2012 for $22 billion. Initially annual subscription to WhatsApp was $0.99, and the app also made money from download fees, but Facebook made it completely free, planning to monetize through selling ads, as The Wall Street Journal explains. 

As of the beginning of 2020, WhatsApp is used by 1.5 billion people globally, but has yet to bring profit to Facebook. 

In May 2019, Facebook officially introduced the prototypes for WhasApp ads in app’s Status feature. However, these plans are laid to rest for now, partly due to the actions of the previous management at WhatsApp. 

Its creators Jan Koum and Brian Acton were openly against ads in WhatsApp, and it seems to be one of the key factors in their decision to leave the company. 

Koum and Acton were the ones who changed WhatsApp’s terms of use to strictly forbid adding ads to it. The idea was to create potential PR problems for Facebook if it ever tries to introduce ads to WhatsApp without notifying the customers in no uncertain terms. 

According to WSJ, 98% of Facebook’s revenue in the third quarter came from ads, so it remains to be seen for how long will the social media giant tolerate unprofitable WhatsApp, and whether Facebook will be able to come up with more creative and user-friendly way to monetize it.

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